Our Goodwood Revival Look

With the Goodwood Revival weekend fast approaching us we are delighted to present to you two of the most perfect 1940's dresses. The mid 1940's saw the rise of patriotic prints of red, white and blue and women proud to wear bold and victorious colours whilst welcoming loved ones home. This was an era crippled by rationing and heartache but one that recognised the importance of expressing beauty, femininity and luxury through dress and design. This relentless pursuit was successful in upholding a sense of national pride and confidence. The 'V for Victory' sign became the iconic symbol of celebration and decorated many American and European fashion magazines. Victor de Lavelaye, head of the Belgian Service of the BBC, first devised the idea of the 'V for Victory' campaign in a broadcast to his countrymen on 14 February 1941. He chose this slogan as the symbol stood for both 'victoire' (victory in French) and 'vrijheid' (freedom in Dutch). Furthermore, Churchill popularised the symbol with his upheld fingers in the shape of a V frequently pictured in popular media. Paris then utilised the symbol as a sign of resistance to the Nazi occupation. Fashion then became a statement of protest and wartime dresses a powerful sign of Allied solidarity. 

Our two dresses are a visual testament to the ingenuity of the era and are a true celebration of British period fashion. Stride into the Goodwood Revival with a restored sense of national pride and we would be honoured to be at your side in assisting you to complete your look. Accessorise with a patriotic themed scarf or brooch emulating a military decoration, this may include items displaying images such as eagles, stars or military insignia. Sweetheart brooches, incorporating the insignia of the boyfriend's regiment or brigade, were made specifically as mementos for girlfriends on the home front. Perhaps experiment with military style collars, braids or hats. We would be delighted to receive photographs of you ladies in your New Look and remember that "Fashions do not die because of wars... Many of the best of them are created by war's necessities," said by American Vogue's editor Edna Woolman Chase in March 1942; you can wear the best of them!